Past Exhibits

No quisiera ser nadie más que yo mismo // I Wouldn't Want to Be Anyone Else

Monday, July 10, 2017 - 9:00am to Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 5:00pm Student Action with Farmworkers
Kreps Gallery

Reception September 10, 2017, 2–4 p.m.

Beyond the Front Porch 2017

Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 9:00am to Saturday, November 11, 2017 - 5:00pm CDS Certificate in Documentary Studies graduates
Porch and University Galleries

Beyond the Front Porch 2017 is an exhibition of work by twelve senior undergraduates—ten from Duke University and two from UNC–Chapel Hill—who will be graduating with a Certificate in Documentary Studies from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. Following, a statement by one of their professors and mentors, Alex Harris:

In Conditions of Fresh Water

Thursday, March 2, 2017 - 9:15am to Saturday, June 10, 2017 - 5:00pm Torkwase Dyson and Danielle Purifoy
Lyndhurst and Kreps Galleries

The exhibition, In Conditions of Fresh Water, on view March 2-June 3, 2017 in the Kreps and Lyndhurst Galleries at the Center for Documentary Studies, presents paintings, drawings, photographs, and writings from the collaborative documentary research of artist Torkwase Dyson, attorney/environmental scientist Danielle Purifoy, and community members of both Alamance and Lowndes Counties, collected...

Post Mégantic

Monday, December 5, 2016 - 9:00am to Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 5:00pm Michel Huneault
Kreps and Lyndhurst Galleries

Canadian documentary photographer Michel Huneault was awarded a solo show at CDS as part of the Lange-Taylor Prize, which he won in 2015 for Post Mégantic, his project on a small town in Quebec that was the site of Canada’s deadliest train disaster in 150 years. The $10,000 prize supports documentary artists, working alone or in teams, whose extended fieldwork projects rely on the interplay of...

The Jemima Code

Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 9:00am to Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 5:00pm Toni Tipton-Martin
Kreps and Lyndhurst Galleries

The idea of a “Jemima Code” came to Toni Tipton-Martin as she was researching the varied history of African-Americans working in America’s kitchens. She discovered that they were virtually invisible. The character, Aunt Jemima, was built on a myth that combined various characteristics of African-American women into one, larger-than-life, mammy culinary stereotype. This stereotype was used to...

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